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Coping with Mortons Neuroma

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MortonMorton's neuroma is named after Dr Morton who first described this condition in 1876. It is sometimes called Morton's metatarsalgia or interdigital neuroma. It is a condition that affects one of the common plantar digital nerves that run between the long bones (metatarsals) in the foot. It most commonly affects the nerve between the third and fourth metatarsal bones, causing pain and numbness in the third and fourth toes. It can also affect the nerve between the second and third metatarsal bones, causing symptoms in the second and third toes. Morton's neuroma rarely affects the nerve between the first and second, or between the fourth and fifth, metatarsal bones. It tends to affect only one foot. It is rare to get two neuromas at the same time in the same foot.

Causes

Anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve can lead to the development of a neuroma. One of the most common causes comes from wearing shoes that have a tapered toe box, or high-heeled shoes that cause the toes to be forced into the toe box and overload pressure onto the forefoot. An injury or trauma to the forefoot may also lead to a neuroma. People at a higher risk of developing a Neuroma include people with certain foot deformities, such as bunions or hammertoes. Certain foot types, such as flat feet (Pronation) More flexible feet, and woman after pregnancy.

Symptoms

Patients will feel pain that worsens with walking, particularly when walking in shoes with thin soles or high heels. Also, anything that squeezes the metatarsal heads together may aggravate symptoms, such as narrow shoes. A patient may feel the need to remove the shoe and rub the foot to soothe the pain.

Diagnosis

Morton?s neuroma can be identified during a physical exam, after pressing on the bottom of the foot. This maneuver usually reproduces the patient?s pain. MRI and ultrasound are imaging studiesthat can demonstrate the presence of the neuroma. An x-ray may also be ordered to make sure no other issues exist in the foot. A local anesthetic injection along the neuroma may temporarily abolish the pain, and help confirm the diagnosis.

Non Surgical Treatment

There are various options for treating the condition, depending on its severity. Self-treatment. Here are some simple steps that may improve symptoms. Wear supportive shoes with a wide toe box. Do not lace the forefoot of the shoe too tightly. Shoes with shock-absorbent soles and proper insoles are recommended. Do not wear tight or pointed toed shoes or shoes with heels more than 2 inches high. Use over-the-counter shoe pads to relieve pressure. Apply an ice pack to the affected area to reduce pain and swelling. Rest your feet and massage the painful area. There are drugs that may temporarily relieve the pain and other symptoms of Morton?s neuroma. Long-term use of these medications is not recommended. Anti-inflammatory drugs-Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen or aspirin, may be taken orally to reduce pain and inflammation. Anti-inflammatory drugs can also be administered by direct injection into the skin. Local anesthetic. An anesthetic injection will temporarily relieve pain by numbing the affected nerve. Orthotics. These are custom-designed shoe inserts that can reduce some of the pain associated with Morton?s neuroma. Sometimes padding is placed around the toe area, and tape is applied to hold the padding in place.Morton

Surgical Treatment

If pain persists with conservative care, surgery may be an appropriate option. The common digitial nerve is cut and the Mortons neuroma removed. This will result is numbness along the inside of the toes affected, and there is a small chance the end of the nerve will form a Stump Neuroma. Approximately 75% of people receive symptom resolution for Mortons Neuroma with conservative care.

Prevention

Wearing shoes that fit properly and that have plenty of room in the toe area may help prevent Morton's neuroma.

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